While the digital book sales are steadily on the rise, and some traditional print mediums are switching to full digital, don’t kid yourself to believe that physical books don’t sell. According to recent articles from New York’s Times and The Guardian, ebook sales are actually taking a dip with physical copies outperforming.

With this framework in mind, let’s look at the fall of Barnes and Noble.

That’s mostly over now. On Monday the company laid off 1,800 people. This offered a cost savings of $40 million. But that’s particularly interesting. That means each of those people made an average of $22,000 or so per year and minimum wage workers – hourly folks who are usually hit hardest during post-holiday downturns – would be making $15,000. In fact, what B&N did was fire all full time employees at 781 stores.

the company laid off 1,800 people. This offered a cost savings of $40 million. But that’s particularly interesting. That means each of those people made an average of $22,000 or so per year and minimum wage workers – hourly folks who are usually hit hardest during post-holiday downturns – would be making $15,000. In fact, what B&N did was fire all full time employees at 781 stores.

Barnes and Noble reports struggles, which is odd since books are selling. Perhaps Barnes and Noble is too bloated for its own good. After all, the stores carry a electronic department thst sales CDs in a world where hardly anyone is buying a physical CD. The electronic department also sells movies, but who goes to Barnes and Noble to buy a movie? Barnes and Noble features hobby centric things, but who the fuck goes to Barnes and Noble to buy a model airplane?

Instead of firing ALL fulltime employees, sending them to the welfare office for food stamps and Medicaid, they could’ve axed whole departments, and perhaps leased the space. Odd suggestion? I though about this for a while, and even if Barnes and Noble closed down the electronic section, kicked out the hobby stuff for Hobby Lobby, and focused on why people shop there in the first place they would be left with huge overhead just from the size of the store alone!

Join me for a moment of pondering. Let’s pretend that we had the power to make the changes needed to bring Barnes and Noble back. What would we do?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s